In this episode the gals are in another crossover with Patrick from A Cave to the Cross Apologetics discussing discernment and rightly judging those teachers who are teaching falsely. What does it mean to slander, blaspheme, or believe/teach heresy? How do we judge righteously? The three discuss each of these issues with a Scriptural perspective.

Intro - Cross over with A Cave to the Cross Apologetics: Patrick Studebaker 

 

  1. Slander TS 00:18:00
    1. Slander (etymologically a doublet of "scandal," from OFr. esclandre, Latin scandalum, "stumblingblock") is an accusation maliciously uttered, with the purpose or effect of damaging the reputation of another. 
    2. As a rule it is a false charge (compare Matthew 5:11); but it may be a truth circulated insidiously and with a hostile purpose (e.g. Daniel 3:8, "brought accusation against," where Septuagint has diaballo, "slander"; Luke 16:1, the same Greek word). 
    3. Warnings, condemnations and complaints in reference to this sin are very frequent, both in the Old Testament and New Testament. Mischievous "tale-bearing" or "whispering" is condemned (Leviticus 19:16Ezekiel 22:9). 
    4. There are repeated warnings against evil-speaking (as in Psalms 34:13Proverbs 15:28Ephesians 4:31Colossians 3:8James 4:111 Peter 3:10), which is the cause of so much strife between man and man (Proverbs 16:27-30), and which recoils on the speaker himself to his destruction (Psalms 101:5140:11). 
    5. Especially is false witness, which is "slander carried into a court of justice," to be condemned and punished (Exodus 20:16Deuteronomy 19:16-21; compare Proverbs 12:1714:5,2519:521:2824:28). 
    6. Special cases of slander more than usually mean are when a wife's chastity is falsely impeached by her husband (Deuteronomy 22:13-19), and when one slanders a servant to his master (Proverbs 30:10). 
    7. Even a land may be slandered as well as persons (Numbers 14:36). Slanderers and backbiters are mentioned in some of Paul's darkest catalogues of evildoers (Romans 1:29,302 Corinthians 12:202 Timothy 3:3). 

 

  1. Heresy  TS 00:37:25
    1. from a Greek word signifying (1) a choice, (2) the opinion chosen, and (3) the sect holding the opinion. 
    2. In the Acts of the Apostles ( 5:17 ;  15:5 ;  Isaiah 24:5  Isaiah 24:14 ;  26:5 ) it denotes a sect, without reference to its character. 
    3. Elsewhere, however, in the New Testament it has a different meaning attached to it. Paul ranks "heresies" with crimes and seditions ( Galatians 5:20 ). 
    4. This word also denotes divisions or schisms in the church ( 1 Corinthians 11:19 ). In  Titus 3:10 a "heretical person" is one who follows his own self-willed "questions," and who is to be avoided. 
    5. Heresies thus came to signify self-chosen doctrines not emanating from God ( 2 Peter 2:1 ).

 

  1. Blasphemy TS 01:05:00
    1. The Old Testament At least five different Hebrew verbs are translated "blaspheme" in English translations. 
    2. Translators choose "blaspheme" when, for instance, the verbs "curse" (qalal [l;l'q]), "revile" (gadap [@;d"G]), or "despise" (herep) are used with God as the object. 
    3. No special verb is reserved for cursing or insults directed at God.
    4. However, to curse or insult God is an especially grave sin. It can be done by word or by deed. There is little distinction between the sinner who deliberately abuses the name of the Lord ( Le 24:10-16 ), and the one who deliberately flouts his commandments ( Nu 15:30-31 ). 
      1. For both, the death penalty is prescribed. 
    5. Similarly, the prayer of the Levites in Nehemiah 9 calls "awful blasphemies" all that Israelites did when they made the golden calf (9:18).
    6. David's flagrant sin with Bathsheba may be called a blasphemy ( 2 Sa 12:14 ), but a more likely translation is that David has "made the enemies of the Lord show utter contempt" (NIV). 
      1. Instead of testifying by lifestyle to the character of the Lord, David's action confirms the blasphemous belief of the nations that the Lord is no different from any other national god. 
    7. The New Testament. The Greek root blasphem- [blasfhmevw] can be used of strong insults thrown at other people ( Mark 15:29 ;  Acts 13:45 ;  Eph 4:31 ;  1 Peter 4:4 ), or even unjust accusations ( Rom 3:8 ), but it is more usually used of insults offered to God (e.g.,  Rev 13:6 ;  16:9 ). 
      1. Jesus is accused of blasphemy for pronouncing forgiveness and for claiming a unique relationship with God ( Matt 26:65 ;  Mark 2:7 ;  John 10:33 ).

 

  1. Righteous Judgement TS 01:16:00
    1. https://www.gotquestions.org/do-not-judge.html
    2. John 7
      1. https://www.biblestudytools.com/esv/john/7.html

 

  1. Christians Should be Balanced - We talk about this several times all through out.
    1. James 2
      1. https://www.biblestudytools.com/james/1.html

 

Shenanigans: TS 01:30:00

Becca: Nacho Libre or Napoleon Dynamite?

Patrick: What is a movie from your childhood that scarred you?

Lauren: Weirdest response or comment from a listener?

 

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